Are dogs good pets? Is that even a question? Puppies are the greatest thing on the planet Earth. Anyone who says otherwise is probably trying to sell you something. 

But there’s a big difference between loving sweet, fluffy puppies and being ready to own one. 

If you’re contemplating whether getting a dog is the right decision for you, keep reading for a few key signs that you’re ready to parent a fur baby. 

You’re Able to Be a Responsible Adult

The foremost sign that you’re ready to have a dog? You’re ready, able, and willing to be a responsible adult. 

Puppies and new dogs require a lot of attention. They’re super cute and they’re far more self-sufficient than baby humans, but keep in mind that they are still babies. 

That means that you need to invest quite a bit of time in training them. The obvious example is potty training, but there’s a lot more training you need to do for your cute puppy to turn into a well-behaved adult dog. 

For example, you need to kennel-train your puppy. You also need to teach them proper manners when going on walks, how to behave around other dogs, obedience training to curb bad habits like chewing shoes or jumping on people, and a laundry list of other training checklists. 

Plus, puppies under six months old need to be fed three times a day, and you can’t leave food out for them–they’re babies, and they’ll wolf all of it at once and make themselves sick. 

Even if you adopt an older dog from a local shelter, they still need an adjustment period to get used to their new home and owner. 

You’re Financially Stable

Besides the time to train a dog, you also need to have the financial stability to support a dog. 

Even if you think you have enough to own a dog, you probably need more. After all, dogs get sick and injured too, and you never know when you might need money saved up in case of emergencies. 

In addition, puppies are expensive to care for in their first year of life–they need a lot of vet visits, vaccinations, and food to thrive. In general, you should plan to spend between $2,000 to $6,600 on your puppy during their first year. 

This depends a bit on what kind of dog you have and what kind of owner you want to be, but if you truly want your dog to be happy and healthy, you should plan on shelling out a bit extra. 

You Live in a Dog-Friendly Area

In addition, you need to think about the area you live in. 

Not all areas are dog-friendly, and some areas are much more expensive to own a dog. Take a look at your area–are there other dogs that live nearby? Are they friendly? Are there any outdoor spaces or designated dog parks? 

You also need to check on any breed or weight restrictions in your city or apartment building (if you live in an apartment). Breed restrictions vary by city, but commonly banned breeds include: 

  • Rottweilers
  • Mastiffs
  • Pitbulls
  • Alaskan Malamutes
  • Siberian Huskies
  • German Shepherds
  • Great Danes
  • Doberman Pinschers
  • Bulldogs
  • Terriers
  • Wolf hybrids

There are many reasons for breed restrictions, ranging from size (Malamutes, Great Danes) to reputation for aggressiveness (Pitbulls, Rottweilers, wolf hybrids) to noise level (Huskies, Terriers). 

If you live in a city, you need to make sure there are plenty of pet-friendly housing options. Otherwise, you and your best friend may have to scramble to find housing. 

Also, make sure that those pet-friendly housing options are within your budget. Most apartment buildings charge an additional security deposit for a pet, as well as monthly pet rent. 

Are Dogs Good Pets? Yes, Obviously!

Are dogs good pets? Yes! But you have to know how to take care of them. 

Adopting a puppy is like adopting a baby that never grows up. On one hand, you’ll never need to worry about sending them to college. On the other hand, your dog has certain needs throughout their life that a child grows out of. 

If you need help figuring out how to care for your first dog, we can help. We offer complete puppy care packages, as well as all kinds of helpful advice on our blog. 

Need to book an appointment for your furry friend? Click here to get started.